Media Articles 2018

BBC Interview with Suzanne Maher of Bye Bye Blue Sky – Audio to be released shortly of the ‘real’ interview and the topics that never received mention in the discussion

January 31, 2018

‘Chemtrail’ conspiracy theorists:  The people who think governments control the weather

Those white lines in the sky trailing behind jet planes are puffy plumes of water vapour. But online, some have twisted them into evidence of a secret plot to control weather or poison the environment. Why are wild theories about contrails and other phenomena so persistent on social media?

Suzanne Maher doesn’t like the term “conspiracy theory”.

When I use it – on a phone call to arrange an interview – she tells me that it was invented by the CIA to discredit those who question the government.

But as the founder of Bye Bye Blue Sky – a group established to raise awareness of so-called “chemtrails” and what she claims is a massive, secret government conspiracy to control the weather – it’s one the Canadian is used to hearing.

“I ask that we move beyond the notion that this is a conspiracy theory,” she says. “Twenty to thirty years ago we never saw these trails. We had a beautiful blue sky.”

http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-42195511

 


BBC.com

March 19, 2018

Lawmaker Sorry for Spreading Anti-Semitic Weather Conspiracy

A local lawmaker in Washington, DC, has apologised for sharing a video based on a conspiracy theory that Jewish financiers control the weather.

Councilman Trayon White Sr posted a video of snow flurries on Friday and warned of “climate manipulation”.

He blamed the Rothschilds, a famous Jewish business dynasty, who are a target of anti-Semitic conspiracies.

Mr White apologised for his comments on social media and said he “did not intend to be anti-Semitic”.

I really do apologise,” he said on Twitter. “I work very closely with the Jewish community and never want to offend anyone, especially with Anti-Semitic remarks.”

The lawmaker said his Jewish friends were helping him realise the way his comments said in the Facebook video were rooted in anti-Semitic thought that dates back centuries.

“I see I should not have said that after learning from my colleagues,” he said.

To read more….

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-43460263